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Frog chooses Biomimicry as tech trend for 2012

January 11, 2012

Global innovation firm Frog Design have listed biomimicry as one of their 15 Technology Trends for 2012.

Consulting Editor Reena Jana predicts that this year will see “increasing numbers of scientists, technologists, architects, corporations, and even governments looking to biomimicry as an efficient innovation strategy”.

Up to now, biomimicry — designing objects and systems based on or inspired by patterns in nature — has been employed as a design strategy in individual architectural and product design projects around the world. However, Jana predicts that “in 2012 influential thinkers will begin to apply biomimetic principles on a larger scale, including the planning of new cities and the updating of urban infrastructures.”

The circular economy framework draws from the concept of biomimicry in designing an economic model that emulates the cycles found in living systems.

Read the full list here

Watch “Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature”, a lecture from Bradford 10+1 by Chris Allen.

Global innovation firm Frog Design have listed biomimicry as one of their 15 Technology Trends for 2012.

Consulting Editor Reena Jana predicts that this year will see “increasing numbers of scientists, technologists, architects, corporations, and even governments looking to biomimicry as an efficient innovation strategy”.

Up to now, biomimicry — designing objects and systems based on or inspired by patterns in nature — has been employed as a design strategy in individual architectural and product design projects around the world. However, Jana predicts that “in 2012 influential thinkers will begin to apply biomimetic principles on a larger scale, including the planning of new cities and the updating of urban infrastructures.”

The circular economy framework draws from the concept of biomimicry in designing an economic model that emulates the cycles found in living systems.

Read the full list here

Watch “Biomimicry: Innovation Inspired by Nature”, a lecture from Bradford 10+1 by Chris Allen.